Wednesday, 10 December 2014

DIABETES - Threat, Analysis & Solution


An article on Diabetes Threat, Analysis & its Solution
Grass-Diabetes.com


NOT TO THREATEN YOU BUT TO MAKE YOU AWARE OF SERIOUSNESS OF DIABETES
People with diabetes have double the risk of pancreatic cancer compared to people who don't have diabetes, according to a new analysis of 88 previous studies
Diabetes has been considered a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but what's not clear is which condition comes first. This new analysis suggests that at least for some people, pancreatic cancer might be responsible for diabetes. 
Experts note, however, that the overall risk for pancreatic cancer remains low among people with diabetes. A major problem with pancreatic cancer, however, is that it's often diagnosed at a very late stage. Overall five-year survival rates are less than 1 percent, and many patients diagnosed with late-stage pancreatic cancer don't survive more than four to six months after the diagnosis, according to background information included in the study. 
Although the current review of past studies found an overall two-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer in people with diabetes, that risk was highest soon after diagnosis. Within the first year after diagnosis, the risk of pancreatic cancer was nearly seven times higher than for someone without diabetes.
Although the risk stays elevated for a long time, after 10 years the risk of pancreatic cancer for someone with diabetes is just 36 percent higher than for someone without diabetes.
HOW TO EARLY DETECT DIABETES BY GENERAL SYMPTOMS?
THIRST: Although people with type 2 diabetes may not have specific symptoms, an increase in thirst is one symptom that is characteristic of the condition. The increased thirst can accompany other symptoms like frequent urination, feelings of unusual hunger, dry mouth, and weight gain or loss.
INFECTIONS: Often, type 2 diabetes is only identified after its negative health consequences are apparent. Certain infections and sores that take a long time to heal are a warning sign. Other possible signs include frequent yeast infections or urinary tract infections and itchy skin.

HEADACHE: Other symptoms that can occur if high blood sugar levels persist are fatigue, blurred vision, and headaches.
SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION: Sexual problems can occur as a result of type 2 diabetes. Since diabetes can damage the blood vessels and nerves in the sex organs, decreased sensation can develop, potentially leading to difficulties with orgasm. Vaginal dryness in women and impotence in men are other complications of diabetes. Estimates suggest that between 35% and 70% of men with diabetes will eventually suffer from impotence. Statistics for women show that about one-third of women with diabetes will have some kind of sexual dysfunction.
Other common symptoms to watch out for diabetes:
·         Urinating more than usual.
·         Extreme hunger, even while eating.
·         Increased fatigue.
·         Blurred vision.
·         Slower healing.
·         Weight loss, even if you've been eating more than usual.
·         Numbness, pain or tingling in the feet or hands

HOW TO ANALYZE THE RISKS OF DIABETES RELATED TO YOUR LIFESTYLE

 

IF YOUR RISK REPORT in Grass-Daibetes.com IS INDICATING HIGH RISKS, YOU MUST GET YOUR BLOOD TESTS CHECKED AT A PATHOLOGY LAB.
KNOW - HOW TYPE 2 DIABETES WILL BE DIAGNOSED AT PATHOLOGY LAB?
The hemoglobin A1c test measures the amount of glycosylated hemoglobin (hemoglobin bound to glucose) in your blood and provides information about your average blood glucose levels over the previous 2 to 3 months. Hemoglobin A1c levels over 6.5% are suggestive of diabetes. Another diagnostic test is the fasting blood glucose test. If your fasting blood glucose level is over 126, this establishes that diabetes is present. Random blood glucose levels over 200 are also consistent with diabetes.
IF YOU ARE DIAGNOSED WITH DIABETES YOU MUST VISIT A CERTIFIED MEDICAL PRACTITIONER.
WHAT DIABETES QUESTIONS YOU CAN ASK YOUR DOCTOR: 
1. Should I get a glucose monitor to self check my blood sugar levels at home?
2. What should be my aim in order to control blood sugar levels? 
3. Are their any warning signs or symptoms that my blood sugar level is getting high, so that I can control it? If still it happens, what should I do?
4. Are their any warning signs or symptoms that my blood sugars are getting too low? What do I do if my blood sugars are too low?
5. Can my lifestyle and eating habits help me live a healthier life even in diabetes? 
6. Are their any side effects of my medications/insulin? 
7. Will I always need medications/insulin to control my diabetes?
8. I've hear a lot about diabetic complications, how can I avoid them?
9. How does my high cholesterol and high blood pressure affects me if I have diabetes? 
10. How often should I visit my doctor to consult on my diabetes management?
If you need any further info please do write to us. We love your feedback. Keep doing well. Our next article is not an article but a suicide note from a man….wait...
Best,

Dr. MS Singhal
MD - www.Grass-Diabetes.com | Singhal Diabetic Clinic, Haridwar

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